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©2018 BY THE PAIK LABORATORY - STEM CELL AGING AND CANCER. PROUDLY CREATED WITH WIX.COM

Thanks for your interest in our research. Get in touch with us for any questions or comments regarding our work and publications. We’d love to hear from you.

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AVAILABLE POSITIONS

POST-DOC

A postdoctoral position is  available in epigenetic regulation of neural stem cell differentiation.

We are interested in studying cell cycle or cell fate-dependent regulation of chromatin remodeling along with coordinated transcriptional regulation. We focus on an aberration in neural differentiation during aging and tumorigenesis.

We are looking for a motivated candidate with strong work ethics. Candidates are expected to have a PhD in above mentioned or related areas. Ideal candidates should have a good understanding of cancer and stem cell biology. Strong communication skill is a requirement.  

Please send a cover letter and CV stating your research interest and career goal to Dr. Jihye Paik

jep2025@med.cornell.edu

GRADUATE STUDENTS

We welcome graduate students!

LLS MCL-RI

January 2018

Our participation in Mantle Cell Lymphoma research initiative is awarded by LLS. Congratulations team.

OUR FOXO IN BRAIN AGING STUDY IS PUBLISHED IN AGING CELL.

November 2017

FOXO transcription factors are critical regulators of lifespan in worms and flies. Whether FOXO modulates mammalian aging has so far remained unclear despite the genetic association of FOXO to extreme longevity and healthspan in humans. Moreover, the evidence linking the FOXO to the regulation of aging-associated pathologies in mammals has not been forthcoming. To address the point, we defined physiological functions of FOXO isoforms during nervous system aging by comparing knockout animals with chronologically aged wild type counterparts and attempted mechanism-based phenotypic rescue.

Don’t miss out on any lab news and updates.

NEWS & RESOURCES

September 2016

Dopaminergic (DA) neurons are involved in the integration of neuronal and hormonal signals to regulate food consumption and energy balance. Forkhead transcriptional factor O1 (FoxO1) in the hypothalamus plays a crucial role in mediation of leptin and insulin function. However, the homoeostatic role of FoxO1 in DA system has not been investigated.

December 2017

Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a progressive and fatal parenchymal lung disease with limited therapeutic options, with fibroblast-to-myofibroblast transdifferentiation and hyperproliferation playing a major role. Investigating ex vivo-cultured (myo)fibroblasts from human IPF lungs as well as fibroblasts isolated from bleomycin-challenged mice, Forkhead box O3 (FoxO3) transcription factor was found to be less expressed, hyperphosphorylated, and nuclear-excluded relative to non-diseased controls.

November 2015

More than half of human colorectal cancers (CRCs) carry either KRAS or BRAF mutations, and are often refractory to approved targeted therapies. We report that cultured CRC cells harboring KRAS or BRAF mutations are selectively killed when exposed to high levels of vitamin C.

October 2015

Forkhead transcription factor family O (FoxO) maintains adult stem cell reserves by supporting their long-term proliferative potential. MicroRNAs (miRs) regulate neuronal stem/progenitor cell (NSPC) proliferation and differentiation during neural development by controlling the expression of a specific set of target genes. In the neurogenic subventricular zone, FoxO1 is specifically expressed in NSPCs and is no longer detected during the transition to neuroblast stage, forming an inverse correlation with miR-9 expression.

November 2016

The differentiation of embryonic mesenchymal cells into chondrocytes and the subsequent formation of a cartilaginous scaffold that enables the formation of long bones are hallmarks of endochondral ossification. During this process, chondrocytes undergo a remarkable sequence of events involving proliferation, differentiation, hypertrophy and eventually apoptosis. Forkhead Box O (FoxO) transcription factors (TFs) are well-known regulators of such cellular processes. Although FoxO3a was previously shown to be regulated by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 in osteoblasts, a possible role for this family of TFs in chondrocytes during endochondral ossification remains largely unstudied.

REGULATION OF AUTOPHAGY AND THE UBIQUITIN-PROTEASOME SYSTEM BY THE FOXO TRANSCRIPTIONAL NETWORK DURING MUSCLE ATROPHY

April 2015

Stresses like low nutrients, systemic inflammation, cancer or infections provoke a catabolic state characterized by enhanced muscle proteolysis and amino acid release to sustain liver gluconeogenesis and tissue protein synthesis. These conditions activate the family of Forkhead Box (Fox) O transcription factors. Here we report that muscle-specific deletion of FoxO members protects from muscle loss as a result of the role of FoxOs in the induction of autophagy-lysosome and ubiquitin-proteasome systems.

DEVELOPMENT OF RESISTANCE TO EGFR-TARGETED THERAPY IN MALIGNANT GLIOMA CAN OCCUR THROUGH EGFR-DEPENDENT AND -INDEPENDENT MECHANISMS

March 2015

Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is highly amplified, mutated, and overexpressed in human malignant gliomas. Despite its prevalence and growth-promoting functions, therapeutic strategies to inhibit EGFR kinase activity have not been translated into profound beneficial effects in glioma clinical trials. To determine the roles of oncogenic EGFR signaling in gliomagenesis and tumor maintenance, we generated a novel glioma mouse model driven by inducible expression of a mutant EGFR (EGFR*).

METABOLIC CIRCUITS IN NEURAL STEM CELLS

July 2014

Metabolic activity indicative of cellular demand is emerging as a key player in cell fate decision. Numerous studies have demonstrated that diverse metabolic pathways have a critical role in the control of the proliferation, differentiation and quiescence of stem cells.

PROLYL HYDROXYLATION BY EGLN2 DESTABILIZES FOXO3A BY BLOCKING ITS INTERACTION WITH THE USP9X DEUBIQUITINASE

July 2014

The three EglN prolyl hydroxylases (EglN1, EglN2, and EglN3) regulate the stability of the HIF transcription factor. We recently showed that loss of EglN2, however, also leads to down-regulation of Cyclin D1 and decreased cell proliferation in a HIF-independent manner. Here we report that EglN2 can hydroxylate FOXO3a on two specific prolyl residues in vitro and in vivo.

FOXO3 COORDINATES METABOLIC PATHWAYS TO MAINTAIN REDOX BALANCE IN NEURAL STEM CELLS

Oct 2013

Forkhead Box O (FoxO) transcription factors act in adult stem cells to preserve their regenerative potential. Previously, we reported that FoxO maintains the long-term proliferative capacity of neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs), and that this occurs, in part, through the maintenance of redox homeostasis. Herein, we demonstrate that among the FoxO3-regulated genes in NPCs are a host of enzymes in central carbon metabolism that act to combat reactive oxygen species (ROS) by directing the flow of glucose and glutamine carbon into defined metabolic pathways.

ZNF365 PROMOTES STALLED REPLICATION FORKS RECOVERY TO MAINTAIN GENOME STABILITY

Aug 2013

The ZNF365 locus is associated with breast cancer risk in carriers of mutated BRCA1 and BRCA2, which are important molecules required for DNA damage response.

ZNF365 PROMOTES STABILITY OF FRAGILE SITES AND TELOMERES

June 2013

Critically short telomeres activate cellular senescence or apoptosis, as mediated by the tumor suppressor p53, but in the absence of this checkpoint response, telomere dysfunction engenders chromosomal aberrations and cancer. Here, analysis of p53-regulated genes activated in the setting of telomere dysfunction identified Zfp365(ZNF365 in humans) as a direct p53 target that promotes genome stability.

FOXOS IN NEURAL STEM CELL FATE DECISION

Oct 2012

Neural stem cells (NSCs) persist over the lifespan of mammals to give rise to committed progenitors and their differentiated cells in order to maintain the brain homeostasis. To this end, NSCs must be able to self-renew and otherwise maintain their quiescence. Suppression of aberrant proliferation or undesired differentiation is crucial to preclude either malignant growth or precocious depletion of NSCs. The PI3K-Akt-FoxO signaling pathway plays a central role in the regulation of multiple stem cells including one in the mammalian brain.

FOXO FAMILY MEMBERS IN CANCER

Aug 2011

The PI3K-Akt-FoxO signaling pathway plays a central role in diverse physiological processes including cellular energy storage, growth, and survival, among others. As an important effector of this pathway, FoxO is involved in versatile activities that protect organisms from stress and aging. Recent studies on mammalian FoxO have established a direct role for this transcription factor family in cellular proliferation, oxidative stress response, and tumorigenesis. The review will focus on the recent developments pertaining to the function of FoxO as well as discuss the various contexts in which FoxO exerts distinct biological activity such as drug resistance and autophagy in cancer pathogenesis and therapy.

March 2016

The transcription factor family FOXO and FOXO3a in particular is of central importance in the long-term maintenance of haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) quiescence, cell number, reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging and long-term repopulation potential. ROS scavengers such as n-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) are able to rescue FOXO deficient HSCs from some of these abnormalities.

November 2017

Neurodegeneration resulting in cognitive and motor impairment is an inevitable consequence of aging. Little is known about the genetic regulation of this process despite its overriding importance in normal aging. Here, we identify the Forkhead Box O (FOXO) transcription factor 1, 3, and 4 isoforms as a guardian of neuronal integrity by inhibiting age-progressive axonal degeneration in mammals.

November 2017

Nearly 3% of the human population carries bi-allelic loss-of-function variants in the gene encoding CLYBL. While largely healthy, these individuals exhibit reduced circulating vitamin B12 levels. In this issue of Cell, Shen and colleagues uncover the metabolic role of CLYBL, linking its function to B12 metabolism and the immunomodulatory metabolite, itaconate.

March 2018

Loss of a cell’s ability to terminally differentiate because of mutations is a selected genetic event in tumorigenesis. Genomic analyses of low-grade glioma have reported recurrent mutations of far upstream element-binding protein 1 (FUBP1). Here we show that FUBP1 expression is dynamically regulated during neurogenesis and its downregulation in neural progenitors impairs terminal differentiation and promotes tumorigenesis collaboratively with expression of IDH1R132H.

PUBLICATIONS

Our Contribution

FOXO IN AGING & LONGEVITY

Scientist in the Lab

NEURAL DIFFERENTIATION AND GLIOMAGENESIS

Molecule

FOXO AND CHROMATIN REMODELING IN 

CANCER

PEOPLE

A Collaborative & Diverse Group

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JIHYE PAIK

PI

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YOONMI NA

Research Assistant

Yoonmi received her MS in cancer biology from Konkuk University in 2012, whereupon she moved to America and worked as a research assistant in a chemistry lab at Florida International University. She then came to New York and worked as a corporate genetics researcher until joining our lab as a research technician in 2016. Outside of work, she relaxes by practicing yoga.

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ARIELLA COLER-REILLY

Alumni

Ariella graduated from UC Berkeley with a B.A. in Molecular and Cell Biology and Japanese. She then spent four years in Japan working in a clinical and translational neuroimmunology lab as a researcher and science writer. She investigated the regulation of FOXO expression in the aging brain in the Paik lab until she started her MD/PhD training in summer 2017. In addition to studying East Asian languages and cultures, she also enjoys watercolor painting and hoop-dancing.

PEOPLE

A Collaborative & Diverse Group

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INAH HWANG

Post-Doc

Inah joined our lab in 2014 after completing both a PhD and postdoc at Ewha Womans University in Korea, where she studied pharmacology. She focused on the protective role of antioxidant catalase against diabetic nephropathy. Now she studies the mechanism of CIC in the development of oligodendroglioma as well as the mechanisms by which Foxo may determine neural stem cell fate. Outside of lab, Inah is very active: she enjoys swing dancing and has run two full marathons.

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EVAN SANTO

Post-Doc

Evan joined the lab in 2015 after completing his PhD in Medicine at the University of Amsterdam, where he studied human genetics and molecular biology. His PhD thesis examined the relationship between forkhead transcription factors and human longevity, and this remains his primary research interest to date. Evan is originally from Long Island, where his two hyperactive cockatiels still live. During his free time, he enjoys swimming in rough seas, which he regards as an interesting metaphor for his professional pursuits.

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HWANHEE OH

Post-Doc

Hwanhee joined the Paik lab in 2013 as a postdoc after completing his PhD at the Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology in Korea, where he was born and raised. At Gwangju, he studied cartilage development and degenerative conditions, such as osteoarthritis. At Cornell, he expanded his interests to include other age-related maladies such as cancer, especially gliobastoma. Outside of work, he enjoys playing Go, known as Baduk in Korea. He loves puppies and hopes to get one in the future as soon as his wife lets him.

THE PAIK LABORATORY- STEM CELL AGING AND CANCER 

THE PAIK LABORATORY

STEM CELL AGING AND CANCER

February 2018

The evolutionarily conserved FOXO family of transcription factors has emerged as a significant arbiter of neural cell fate and function in mammals. From the neural stem cell (NSC) state through mature neurons under both physiological and pathological conditions, they have been found to modulate neural cell survival, stress responses, lineage commitment, and neuronal signaling. 

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